Check It Out, Ohioans: Free Patient Navigator Course from Komen

Our friends at Susan G. Komen Columbus have announced a fantastic and free breast cancer training opportunity for clinical or community-based patient navigators. If you’re in Ohio, you can apply for this blended-learning program to “increase your patient needs assessment skills and learn about resources to help support patients through the continuum of care.” Read more below, and apply by Feb. 11:

Patient Navigator Course for Laypeople and Clinical Professionals

Komen Columbus is excited to announce we are accepting applications for a free course for community-based or clinical patient navigators interested in increasing their patient needs assessment skills and learning about resources to help support patients through the continuum of care. Though this training focuses on patient navigation after an abnormal screening result, it may be appropriate to build skills for navigation to screening as well.

The deadline to apply is February 11. The course will begin March 1st, and continue for 10 weeks. Twenty-two CNE credits are available through the Oncology Nursing Society.

Participants for the first training will be selected from submitted applications. Complete an application by Feb.11. There are the following requirements to participate:

  • Located in Ohio
  • Supervisor letter of recommendation and support
  • Baseline measurements submitted before course. Measurements will be collected upon applicant’s selection. For example, the number of patients with abnormal screening results who completed diagnostic testing.
  • Follow-up measurements
  • Participation in in two live webinar sessions
  • Completion of a module and quiz each week to move on to the next module

March 1, 10 am-noon: webinar course introduction and welcome module
Week 1: Organizational and Documentation Skills
Week 2: Disparities and Social Determinants of Health
Week 3: Assessment Skills
Week 4: Breast Continuum of Care Part 1
Week 5: Breast Continuum of Care Part 2
Week 6: Navigating Health Insurance
Week 7: Service Coordination
Week 8: Genetics
Week 9: Health Coaching and Motivational Interviewing
May 10, 10 am-12 pm: Live webinar course conclusion

Need Core Skills Training?

Involve your team in high-quality online education in health insurance, health literacy and motivational interviewing in the Core Skills Learning Track.

Request information now

Three Easy Steps for Asthma Education

Young woman using spirometry asthma device

Helping community members manage asthma can be as easy as sharing a few key pieces of knowledge—even if you don’t have a dedicated asthma care team.

According to the American Lung Association, asthma is one of the main reasons that students miss school due to illness. Making a few changes can significantly change those statistics.

Changes that work for people with asthma or their caregivers don’t have to be about major lifestyle overhauls. They can be as simple as:

  • Remove your shoes at the door
  • Ventilate your home
  • Clean green

These are three tips from CHWTraining’s Improving Asthma Outcomes program, which aims to instruct peer educators on guiding patients and clients to making easy changes that improve the quality of their life.

The program, which is available as an Express Course or as part of the Asthma Learning Track, shows participants how to recognize asthma symptoms, identify and use asthma medications and reduce asthma triggers in the home. The online program consists of about three hours of online instruction and is a complement to existing home visit programs, or a supplement to organizations without any.

Express courses are available for 15 days and take a few hours to complete. Learning Tracks are training bundles that are available for about a month. The Asthma Learning Track includes the courses Improving Asthma Outcomes, Health Literacy and Tobacco Cessation.

For more information, read about Improving Asthma Outcomes or the Asthma Learning Track.

[Photo credit: International Asthma day 2011 in Malmö, Hans Hansson on Flickr]

Certificate in Improving Asthma Outcomes

Improve health in your community by giving your employees and volunteers a certificate from our Improving Asthma Outcomes learning track. One month, key skills, success for your organization.

Get started now

Does your staff know enough about health coaching and motivational interviewing?

As health-based organization, you already know that motivating community members to change is tough. Make sure your CHWs, patient navigators, promontoras and other health workers are doing all they can to empowered clients and patients to live a healthier life.

The course Health Coaching and Motivational Interviewing helps you see greater results from client interactions.

This on-target course covers the essentials your staff needs to know for coaching and MI. This course defines health coaching activities, why and how it is done and how patients or clients might view self-care. It also covers stages of change, and techniques for motivational interviewing and goal-setting.

Best of all, you can enroll up to 20 people for the same low price.

Read about Health Coaching and Motivational Interviewing.

Ebola Educational Materials for Health Workers

If there’s one enormous lesson US-based health organizations can take from the Ebola crisis, it’s to be prepared. Yet in my experience working with health departments across the United States, this preparedness rarely trickles down to health workers who are in the field.

If you haven’t yet begun training your healthcare staff in what to do with Ebola in your community, start now. Here are a few dependable resources you can begin with by circulating to your team:

Ebola: What Business Travellers Need To Know

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Excellent introductory video from International SOS on risks and statistics about EVD. Aimed at business travelers, but helpful information for anyone wondering more about the disease.

Watch the video >>

What Is Contact Tracing?

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Helpful infographic from the CDC on what contact tracing is and how the process works. Especially useful for understanding how CHWs fit into the process.

Download the PDF >>

Standard Operating Procedures for Contact Tracing and Follow up during Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak

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A succinct 11-page document that outlines the procedures for contact tracing and gives worksheets for keeping notes.

Download the PDF >>

Ebola Guides and Factsheets from CDC

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A comprehensive website that contains constantly updated information on new guidelines and instructions on dealing with EVD, from signs and symptoms to treatment.

View the website >>

Free On-Demand Webinar: Introduction to E-Learning for AHECs

Length: 60 minutes

Everyone talks about online learning, but what does it really mean? We’ll cut through the jargon to explain the basics of health-based e-learning, and discuss why offering online courses can help you boost your enrollment numbers. We’ll identify the elements you’ll need to structure your online training program.

Watch this on-demand webinar to learn how to get the whole team on board, what the technology requirements are, and why your learners are probably asking for online module delivery. You’ll walk away with knowledge about online training that will help energize your organization and help you increase participation in your program.

View the webinar now >>

Positive Thinking: How To Change Attitudes About E-Learning

Don’t let negative thinking about e-learning derail your project. Use these strategies to change your employee’s attitudes.

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Do your employees and trainers have a dark outlook toward your e-learning project?

Not to worry. Your online training plans need not be a disaster. In fact, the online training you provide to naysayers can become one of your best benefits if you follow these simple strategies.

Provide extra support.

Fear is often the seed of negative feelings. And technology, warranted or not, is often the seed of fear. Many people worry about technology: will they be able to log in? Will they understand how to use the course? Will they fall behind and not be able to catch up?

Provide extra support, comfort and guidance when you start a new online training program. By making sure your learners understand that they’ll receive just as much help as they need, you’ll quiet many of their fears.

New technology also seems scarier in concept than in reality. You can soothe apprehension by providing an orientation to learners, either a pre-recorded version or in an in-person session. (For an extra boost, read Tech Support Survival Guide.)

Provide blended learning.

Many people resist online training because there’s a lot to like about in-person training. They like seeing the instructor in person. They look forward to the opportunity to network with colleagues they rarely see. They like the tea and cookies.

But launching a new online training project doesn’t mean you have to abandon your in-person training. You can marry the two by providing blended learning. Many programs, especially longer ones, often include in-person elements, such as a live kickoff session or a conclusion together to practice new skills.

Read more about what it takes to launch a blended learning project.

Reinforce in the workplace.

The best hopes you have of employees retaining what they learn is to reinforce learning in the workplace. Another benefit of reinforcing new skills right away is that other employees will see the effects of the training. That could be enough to institute an attitude shift.

Make it usable.

Not all online training programs were created equal. Some are, simply put, horrid. Many people have a bad attitude about e-learning because they’ve had a bad experience with it before. They’re too long, they’re boring, they don’t relate to an employee’s job, the technology is awkward.

You can, and should, address each of these issues in turn. By aligning your material to your organizational goals, it will relate to each learner. By using good, dependable system, you’ll limit technology problems. By hiring the right curriculum developers to create engaging content, you’ll have courses that people want to take.

Read 7 Resources That Will Improve Your Training Program’s Accessibility.

Make benefits clear.

Employees rarely jump at any extra work simply because. They want to know what’s in it for them, so tell them. Make sure they know what the benefits of the training are and why they should be taking the course.

Benefits can be anything from new skills in the job (“You can receive this new equipment if you learn to use it”) or tangible items, like certificate of completion or a recognition plaque. Even the smallest reward can make learners feel like they’ve received something worthwhile from their course.

Free Case Study

How AHEC of Southeastern Massachusetts Successfully Shifted to Online Training

Read about how this health education organization increased their capacity to train learners with e-learning.

Download the case study

Positive Thinking: How To Change CHW Attitudes About E-Learning

Don’t let negative thinking about e-learning derail your health worker training project. Use these strategies to change your attitudes.

Do your staff and trainers have a dark outlook toward your e-learning project?

Not to worry. Your online training plans need not be a disaster. In fact, the online training you provide to naysayers can become one of your best benefits if you follow these simple strategies.

Provide extra support.

Fear is often the seed of negative feelings. And technology, warranted or not, is often the seed of fear. Many people worry about technology: will they be able to log in? Will they understand how to use the course? Will they fall behind and not be able to catch up? It’s understandable, especially since CHWs value their time connecting with individuals.

Provide extra support, comfort and guidance when you start a new online training program. By making sure your learners understand that they’ll receive just as much help as they need, you’ll quiet many of their fears.

New technology also seems scarier in concept than in reality. You can soothe apprehension by providing an orientation to learners, either a pre-recorded version or in an in-person session.

Provide blended learning.

Many people resist online training because there’s a lot to like about in-person training. They like seeing the instructor in person. They look forward to the opportunity to network with colleagues they rarely see. They like the tea and cookies.

But launching a new online training project doesn’t mean you have to abandon your in-person training. You can marry the two by providing blended learning. Many programs, especially longer ones, often include in-person elements, such as a live kickoff session or a conclusion together to practice new skills.

Read more about what it takes to launch a blended learning project.

Reinforce in the workplace.

The best hopes you have of health workers retaining what they learn is to reinforce learning in the workplace. Another benefit of reinforcing new skills right away is that other health workers will see the effects of the training. That could be enough to institute an attitude shift.

Make it usable.

Not all online training programs were created equal. Some are, simply put, horrid. Many people have a bad attitude about e-learning because they’ve had a bad experience with it before. They’re too long, they’re boring, they don’t relate to an employee’s job, the technology is awkward.

You can, and should, address each of these issues in turn. By aligning your material to your organizational goals, it will relate to each learner. By using  good, dependable system, you’ll limit technology problems. By hiring the right curriculum developers to create engaging content, you’ll have courses that people want to take.

Read 7 Resources That Will Improve Your Training Program’s Accessibility.

Make benefits clear.

Employees rarely jump at any extra work simply because. They want to know what’s in it for them, so tell them. Make sure they know what the benefits of the training are and why they should be taking the course.

Benefits can be anything from new skills in the job (“You can receive this new equipment if you learn to use it”) or tangible items, like certificate of completion or a recognition plaque. Even the smallest reward can make learners feel like they’ve received something worthwhile from their course.

Free Case Study

How AHEC of Southeastern Massachusetts Successfully Shifted to Online Training

Read about how this health education organization increased their capacity to train learners with e-learning.

Download the case study

Register for What Every AHEC Needs To Know About Online Training

CHWTraining.org (a project of Talance) is hosting a free webinar event on October 7 for any AHEC administrator hungry for information about how to expand education and enrollment through e-learning. Directors, program administrators and trainers from AHECs are invited to attend.

Introduction to E-learning: What Every AHEC Needs To Know About Online Training is complimentary and will begin at 1pm Eastern (10am Pacific), during which you’ll learn:

  • How to get the whole team on board
  • What the technology requirements are
  • Why your learners are probably asking for online module delivery
  • And much more!

Space is limited for this event, so you don’t want to miss your chance to get in on the action. Please register now!

LIVE WEBINAR DETAILS:

Date: Oct. 7, 2014

Time: 10am Pacific/1pm Eastern

Duration: 60 minutes

Register for the webinar >>

Hidden Challenges of Training Remote Learners

People who want to build healthier communities in remote areas are often left out of excellent training opportunities. They simply live too far from a central meeting space to participate in many courses. Online learning is an obvious solution because organizations can deliver high-quality education without the need of a meeting space. So directors and managers often throw online courses at their most far-flung workers and consider the job done. Sure, Internet-based training can make a difference between building skills as a professional and lacking knowledge. But training people who live far from their peers isn't as straightforward as it sounds. Programs focused on improving population health when those populations are far from a central hub are best if they address a few key factors from the beginning.

Provide contact with mentors or coaches.

If a worker works in an office or health care setting, they have regular contact with managers or coaches and can use new skills with their supervisors right away. A little extra attention, and accountability, can make a big difference in a health worker implementing what they learned faster and better. Some remote workers don't have regular access to supervisors or mentors, so what they pick up in class could sit stagnant. 

If mentors aren't in the learners' communities, put them there, at least virtually. This could mean setting up phone calls with a coach to discussion implementation of the skills, or requiring regular online check-ins through the forums or email. Online mentoring relationships have the advantage of connecting in a way that can be challenging with face-to-face programs. It can be helpful for leveling gender and racial differences in some fields or vocations, according to Elearn Magazine.

Establish networks with peers.

One tremendous benefit to working with others in an online course is being able to make connections with people who also work in and understand the community. People quickly seek out others that live nearby and might already know of helpful resources in the area. Some programs even encourage out-of-class networking  by offering in-person sessions to complement online time. If a learner sees there are no nearby peers in their class, they're more likely to feel disengaged and ignore the opportunity to make connections online.

One idea is to create or encourage participation in a Community of Practice (CoP). The CDC provides instructions for setting up Communities of Practice, which are meant to "strengthen public health as members learn, share expertise, and work together on solving common problems in their communities' focus areas."

If you are looking for a less ambitious solution, you can offer other ways for people to connect:

  • Create activities that foster group work.
  • Invite people in complementary job functions to participate in the course if they live or work in the same area.
  • Schedule semi-annual or quarterly networking meetings so people can connect outside of class time.
  • Encourage participation in online peer groups outside the course.

Provide remote training via reliable technology.

Internet connection in faraway places might not be easy for everyone. Some people rely on libraries or other public terminals for connectivity. These terminals could be in small facilities with limited open hours and competition for use. Bad roads or spotty Internet connections, made worse in bad weather, can make this even more of a challenge. If you can, establish additional places or kiosks that learners can use for their work. You might be able to send a laptop or iPad to a nearby office or even make one available to the learner so they can participate. Do a little groundwork and find out where public computers are located so you can give your learners a list of places they can access. Even if remote learners have a home or work internet connection, loosen your policy to accommodate outages. Downed phone lines during ice storms can cut off a community and make a learner miss deadlines. Notify your facilitator where learners before class so they can be aware of any kinds of access blocks. Remember that a learner can be "remote" even if they're down the block from your head office. Job interruptions, vacations and a busy life can all interrupt participation in a class.

Think about how these strategies apply to all your learners, and you could find that your online learning program is an even greater success.

AHEC of Southeastern Massachusetts: An E-learning Case Study

Summer is over, and it’s time to start planning new training programs for your learners.

If you’ve wondered how you might transition to an online learning strategy, here’s a case study to give you some confidence and inform you of best practices. The short case study How AHEC Of Southeastern Massachusetts Successfully Shifted To Online Training (PDF; 633 KB) shows how AHEC of Southeastern Massachusetts launched two new courses online and kicked off a new e-learning method of serving learners.

Download the Case Study