The Book or Byte?

I just submitted my article to The Jewish Daily Forward on how Jewish nonprofits are faring with Web 2.0 technology. The short answer: they've got some catching up to do. An interesting idea came up during my research. I was asking Rabbi Hayim Herring from STAR (Synagogues: Transformation and Renewal) if he had thoughts about why Jewish philanthropies are slow to jump on the Web 2.0 bandwagon, especially when some Christian organizations are maybe better thought of as Church 2.0.

Free Love: Photoshop Express

A sadly underfunded client of mine who can't get money for a full-blown version of Photoshop told me about Adobe Photoshop Express.

Express is the latest of of SaaS (Software as a Service) offerings. SaaS boils down to online versions of the kinds of software you're used to buying as a package you install on your computer. Like, say, Photoshop. But instead of paying $700 for the mega version, you pay nothing for this online version.

Free AdWords for Nonprofits

Here’s another good reason for you nonprofits to set up your own websites: Google Grants. If you have 501(c)(3) status, you can apply to receive free AdWords advertising on Google – this is worth it! As cited on the Google site:

Google Grant recipients use their award of free AdWords advertising on Google.com to raise awareness and increase traffic. Three of our award recipients have achieved these results:

Tips for Creating a Tech Dream Team

Which would be the smarter way to run a project:
  1. Leave all decisions-making power and creative control to a single person with a genius IQ, or
  2. Share decisions and idea-making among a team of interested people?
There may be some power-hungry geniuses who could effectively argue the first choice, but my money is on a shared responsibility. No matter how well I know something, I can't honestly believe I'll think of every angle, and that's why it's important to gather feedback.

Politics 2.0.co.uk

[This article about how politicians in the UK are using the Web appears in the February issue of N-TEN.] by Monique Cuvelier, Talance, Inc. Back when everyone was saying Al Gore "invented the Internet," no one rolled their eyes more than the Brits. Back then, the very notion of Internet-based technologies was enough to send British eyes into one-eighties, never mind the marriage of politics and social media. The idea of the Queen appearing on YouTube? Patently ridiculous.

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